Sports Injuries – Spring into Action

by Tim “Trapper” O’Connell MS, LAT

MCHS Divisional Director/Pro Care Orthopedics/CHW Family Med/Occupational Med

 

As seen in Odessa American Medical Matters:

http://www.oaoa.com/people/health/medical_matters/article_de944cda-3eba-11e8-959f-af0df70315ea.html

Sports injuries occur in the spring due to many conditions and it is now the time of the year to address preventive measures. As a parent, coach or athlete, preparation and understanding your level of fitness will help reduce pain, injury, lost playing time and money.

The first tip is to continue to hydrate.

Yes, you have to drink more water to compensate for fluid loss during exercise. A loss of body fluid is a set up for dehydration and cramps. This will ultimately be a step in prevention of muscle strains and possible tendon injuries. Drink water before, during and after practice and games. Warming up five to seven minutes before your activity is essential and good time to start drinking water. Are sports drinks good to drink before your activity? Let’s address that at a later time. The short answer for now is, drink more water.

A consideration for all age groups is skin care.

Use generous amounts of sunscreen products and of course SPF 30 is recommended as starting strength in most cases. Take into account for younger age group, face protection and wearing clothing and/or a hat in peak UV exposure. Burns are painful and can be debilitating.  Re-application is a strong method to boost skin coverage for those extended hours in the sun.  Follow instructions on the container.

Shoes

Great fitting and supportive shoes will prevent the blisters, shin splints and “kneecap” (patellar) bony and tendon inflammation.

Warm up and Cool down

Another good rule of thumb for all athletes is “warm up and cool down”. Use heat to increase circulation before the event and ice after the event to decrease pain and inflammation. Rest and recovery are good to allow the body to charge back up. Take frequent breaks and ease back into activity after your break.

Basic first aid kits are an excellent tool to have available in your car or at sports events. If you do incur an injury, here are some simple tips.

Bleeding

If bleeding occurs, apply pressure with a clean cloth. Clean and/or rinse area. Cover with bandage and secure area. If bleeding continues, seek advanced medical help.

Swelling

If swelling occurs, assess area for instability (dislocated, unable to walk or move body part). Compare to opposite limb if possible, ice or cool compress for injured area. Seek advanced medical help in regard to his/her perceived level of pain or level of disability.

Prevention

Consistency in exercise is a key factor to physical conditioning and starting your spring and summer outside activities. Short periods of exercise each day need to include a functional, dynamic warm up. Take a walk or jog, depending on your physical restrictions. I recommend walking for time and not distance. This will allow you to exercise in minutes and not concern yourself with how far you have moved in your activity. We will also address your heart rate and exercise heart rate in another article. For now, address your exercise and heart rate with your primary physician.

If you have questions or concerns about an injury, please don’t hesitate to call Trapper, ProCare Orthopedics, at 432-640-2793.

Get outside and have a SUPER SPRING!